The Computer Automation Museum Project



Project-information Page

// This page contains information about the project //
// The museum does not yet have a web site //


Table of contents

  Items wanted
  Recent donations
  Computer models
  LSI-2 instruction set
  Known part numbers
  Collection:
Hardware
Software
Manuals
Books
   Reading paper tapes
   Gallery
 

Objectives

The objective of the museum os to collect, save and display every aspect of Computer Automations, Inc, including
  • Company history
  • Software
  • Hardware
  • Manuals
  • Documentation
  • Source code
  • Technical drawings
  • Marketing material

 

Contact information

Address
Vadmöllan 211
S-225 94 Lund
SWEDEN

  Lars Hamrén, curator

Telephone:
+46 46 189090
Mobile:
+46 705 189090
E-mail:
hamren@sdu.se

Contributing

Any and all information and items on relating to Computer Automation are welcome. Especially important are
As these will lead to all other items of interest.
Tracing persons in a country where you do not yourself live can be quite difficult, since you do not know how and where to search. Help in this area is appreciated.

             
Do not underestimate the value of your prospective contribution.
Contributions that may seem insignificant to you may well be quite valuable.
             

Wanted

Time seems to be running out for these old machines, as the last remaining machines goes to scrap, so any and all contributions will be most welcome:
  • Complete computers
  • Software, e.g.
    • Operating system, and other system software
    • Compilers: Fortran, Pascal et c.
    • Interpreters: Basic and others
    • Diagnostig tools
  • Manuals
  • Technical documentation
  • Parts
    • CPU
    • Memory
    • Interface cards
    • Power supply
    • & c.
  • Hard disks
    • Pertec D33XX series, or other model. See the Pertec D33XX page.
    • Drive units
    • Media
    • Disk controllers
  • Mechanical TTY
    • Teletype ASR-33, or other model
    • Paper
    • Paper tape
Here is a large image (separate window) of the LSI2, mounted in a rack, from Roger D Moores pages.
  

donations

   From Mr. John Deutsch, London, UK
   From Martin Richards, at University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, Cambridge, UK:
  • 1 LSI-4/30 computer, 2 LSI-4/10 computers
  • 1 General Automation GA/220 computer
  • Several Manuals
  • Peripherals
   From Mr. Michael Harbinson, The Netherlands:
  • 2 5 slot chassis with power supply
  • 3 LSI-2/20 cpu boards with option cards and front panels
  • 16+8 kWord core memory
  • 1 Extender board, 2 prototype boards
  • Software and manuals
   From Richard W. Burwood, UK


Computer models


Model
Released
Mem
kWords
# of
instr.
# of
irq:s
# of
reg:s

PDC 808
May 1968




?
PDC 816
Dec 1968
4-16 kW
140+
3
7
?
108
Jul 1969




?
208
Jul 1968




?
808
Jul 1970




?
116





?
216





?
Alpha 8
Naked Mini 8





?
Alpha 16
Naked Mini 16

2-32 kW
145
3
7
?
Naked Mini LSI-1
1973





Naked Mini LSI-2
1974





LSI-2/10


188


Identical to LSI-2/20, but half the speed
LSI-2/20


188


Base LSI-2 model
LSI-2/40


188


Faster than the LSI-2/20
LSI-2/60
1975




Extended instruction set aimed at commercial applications
LSI-3/05
1975




Uses a subset of the LSI-2 instruction set
LSI-4/10
1977





LSI-4/30
1977





LSI-4/90
1977






For the 8, 16 and LSI series, the Naked Mini models were processor boards aimed at the OEM market, while Alpha models were complete stand-alone computers.

LSI-2 Series

The LSI-2 series consisted of several model:

LSI-3 Series


Hardware in the collection


LSI-2/20 system with 8 kWord memory [in working order]
Complete rack-mounted system in 5 slot-chassi with power supply . Includes programmers front panel.
Includes a yet untested option board.

LSI-2/20 system with 16 kWord memory [in working order]

Complete rack-mounted system in 5 slot-chassi with power supply. Includes programmers front panel.
Inludes a yet untested option board.

LSI-2/20 CPU [in working order]

Inludes a yet untested option board.

Programmers front panel for LSI-2  [defective]

This may just be mechanical problems du to broken plastic mounting holes.

One full-width extender board
(part number 53265-02-A; SN 0451) [untested]

One half-width prototype board (part number 53234-??)[untested]


Three third-party half-width serial cards with external connect boxes [untested]

These half-width quad RS-232 cards were developed by Michael Harbinson at MacroData in The Netherlands. instruction set found on "Alpha" series machines for all examples.